The Dog Ate My Homework

If I reach the peak of laziness, I would really use whatever decent excuse I can to escape from doing whatever academically-related stuff I am supposed to do. Sadly, I can’t use the title as an excuse because (1) This is an old and lame excuse, and (2) I don’t have a dog.

Because I am lazy to think of any other excuse, I will comply with my requirements (one of which is, ehem, this communication blog). It just sucks that the ‘dog ate my homework’ excuse is already obsolete. And the reason is simply because majority of homework are not done using paper anymore.

Dear Pup, Our excuse is not effective anymore.

I once had a subject wherein my professor promoted a ‘paperless class’ policy. Our reaction papers are submitted online, exams are done online, and references can also be found online. There are a number of reasons to love this policy:

No time limit. You can do your assignment any time of the day. It’s your call whether to do it days before or you like to meet face-to-face with the deadline. However, this has a downside: one word, Procrastination.

See, no Pressure! Answering exams inside the classroom is something to be absolutely scared of. The silence, the pressure, the hunger, the sighs of your classmates and the presence of your professor. Add to that your limited answer sheet and your pen about to breathe its last. When doing your assignment online, you’ll say goodbye to all of these—plus, you are free to ask questions from your classmates and you can even have snacks while doing your assignment (I bet most of my classmates will agree).

This is what we know best. We grew up in a community surrounded by computers. A lot of us would prefer a keyboard than a pen. The internet provides a vast array of resources, Formatting of documents is easier, and errors are easier to delete. Life is good.

But! There could still be a thousand excuses to get out of homework done on the computer. I can imagine people begging for deadline extensions because their DSL connections are choppy, their keyboard is busted, and so on.

Which do you prefer, doing assignments manually or using the internet for submissions? Post your reactions below. 🙂

PS. (In response to the first paragraph) Don’t worry, people. I haven’t reached the peak of laziness yet—ever. I still have the burden in my heart to comply with requirements, and I know that burden won’t leave me until I graduate. 😀

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11 Comments Add yours

  1. Mina Loyola says:

    I don’t mind using the Internet for submissions, because of the environmental-friendly idea, but in my opinion, it takes more discipline to submit online requirements on time, because the tendency is to shrug it off and do it minutes before the deadline. You’re right, we think that we can do away with our requirements because we have ‘full control’ of the medium, because our generation knows this best.

    I remember submitting an integration paper for 104 via the Y! Group, and I wrote that paper just an hour before the deadline. I was trembling while I was typing and uploading because I might not be able to submit the paper (the upload function closes after the deadline). While I made it on time, I feel that I could have submitted a better piece had I worked on it earlier. I learned my lesson ever since. 😀

    For references, I prefer reading PDFs and online references more than their library counterparts. It saves time because you don’t have to go bookhunting at Diliman, but the downside is, if your professor requires photocopied/printed copies of your resources. Printing costs hurt.

    1. KC says:

      Yo, Mina! If we’ll take into consideration the environmental friendly idea, I also agree that submitting requirements online is the way to go. But knowing our generation, we tend to be distracted right away when we work on a computer–worse, if that computer has internet connection. This happens to me all the time, and in fact, this blog post took almost four hours, just because I insert facebook-ing every now and then. 😛

  2. Gel says:

    Based on my own standards, I deliver better content when I do requirements online. We have these spurts of brilliance whenever we’re doing something, and sometimes we want to incorporate them in our output but we feel we must search for them first. Do you experience that too? Haha. So it’s harder to do stuff offline because what’s in the outline is THE outline. There’s little room for impulsive creativity and thought. 🙂

  3. KC says:

    Yo, Angel! Yes, your situation happens to me as well and it’s nice to have the internet to provide us the information that we could include in our output (but, we have to use credible sources and properly cite them 😉 ).

  4. slightlydillydallying says:

    KC, what about: The dog ate my laptop? :)). Kidding aside, I personally prefer the digital means of complying with academic tasks. The bottom line is, I can manage my time better in front of a computer screen than staring at a blank piece of paper. For me, it eases time pressure, doesn’t hamper freewheeling, and encourages multi-tasking. But of course, I still find it necessary to take exams in classrooms and submit answers through tangible materials (i.e. the dreaded answer sheet).

  5. With this new way of complying with class requirements, I guess our excuses need an upgrading as well, KC! What about configuring a cyber pup slash homework eater? Hehe. 🙂

    Kidding aside, I believe this emerging trend of paperless education teaches us another lesson on adaptation. We can’t stop our professors from leaving the traditional paper piles system and start going by a paperless class policy. If it would make things easier for them and us, then expect papers to be submitted, group works be done and references be posted online.

    So what do we do? Better be ready for this shift. Know that online, there are much more distractions and time eaters. That when we meet deadlines online, we feed on more creative excuses and end up procrastinating. Dear, we’d be needing much self-control and focus when we study, do homeworks and pass requirements online. E-ducation, I believe, is a tough test of discipline for us students. What do you think, KC?

    By the way, this post made me miss Madame Inton badly. 😦 And our 104 integ papers required to be posted in our Ygroups 11:59pm sharp!

  6. I prefer to pass homeworks online, of course. It saves us the effort and the money for printing it, that’s five pesos, you know. An idea just popped into my mind when I read your post. Yes, making acads stuff computerized and online really gives us much convenience. But think about it, it also gives us much inconvenience. How so? During our parents’ time, homeworks are announced during class. Research was harder so the minimum time allotted to make papers are at least two weeks. But now, since everything is instant, they can give us more things to do in with a lesser timeframe to do them. For example, I have this Prof that gives us requirements the DAY BEFORE the class! What the HELL?! And we couldn’t do anything about it. :((

  7. I prefer to pass homeworks online, of course. It saves us the effort and the money for printing it, that’s five pesos, you know. An idea just popped into my mind when I read your post. Yes, making acads stuff computerized and online really gives us much convenience. But think about it, it also gives us much inconvenience. How so? During our parents’ time, homeworks are announced during class. Research was harder so the minimum time allotted to make papers are at least two weeks. But now, since everything is instant, they can give us more requirements to do, with a lesser timeframe to do ALL OF THEM. For example, I have this Prof that gives us requirements the DAY BEFORE the class! What the HELL?! And we couldn’t do anything about it. 😦

    1. KC says:

      Hey, I guess I know this professor. Is HE a professor of an SSP Cognate? 🙂

  8. juolpindo says:

    I’m used of doing homeworks and assignments online. So, if you were to ask me, of course, I would like to do it online. However, sometimes unexpected circumstances force us to do things the old way. Remember when typhoon basyang struck the metro? Since much of us ran out of battery, we have to do our things offline. One of the most important lessons that I’ve learned form that experience is that nothing beats doing things old school. Though the new social media, the internet, online communities, etc. may help us a lot, I must agree with you that it develops the habit of procrastination. I honestly think that we also need to train a good habit of doing things old school. Just like what we have learned form other classes, we should always have a plan b. And in times when power interruptions prevents us from doing things online, our knowledge on the traditional method or technique of doing things may serve as a good plan b.

  9. chocostraws says:

    This blog is my favorite. haha.

    Yes, internet empowers the students in a lot of ways. What I don’t understand is why the UPM system still uses the manual registration when in fact, they can save more money if the whole registration process is done online. I don’t see the point in registering online, then registering AGAIN manually. 😦

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