How Power Failure Changed My Life

I just had the biggest realization (so far): living in a dormitory with no internet connection, no wi-fi, no laptop, no anything is NOT easy. It’s like abstaining from watching your favorite TV show or cutting off your dominant hand. Okay, I am exaggerating. But seriously, it wasn’t easy.

So, when I got the chance to be in our home in Bulacan, the word “excited” is an understatement. I will get to see my family, the television, a refrigerator, and Agent P—the computer (“P” stands for “personal”, as in personal computer. Yes, I am a loser in giving names). Just when I was about to sit and look around on Facebook, something unexpected happened. So unexpected, it made me invent words to scream.

A brownout.

That brownout took my life for two days, leaving me unproductive of all these things:

My part-time job. I work as an online tutor to Japanese students and Internet connection for me is as important as my English proficiency in this matter. So when I realized I would not be able to teach because of the brownout, I almost cried. A day’s salary gone with a snap. And if brownouts like these continue to happen, this poor kid might lose her job.

My Academic work. I was supposed to download Critical Theory e-books for my report on my thesis subject. You know how paranoid I am when it comes to that subject (even the very word makes me cringe, let alone remembering my professor’s face). But because of THAT event, my plans weren’t able to push through.

My scheduled bonding moment with Mom via Yahoo! Messenger. I am always excited to come home and open my Y!Messenger account because I know that I can have a chat with my Mom abroad. Because Y!M is free of charge and even allows people to see each other while talking, we prefer it more than the telephone. The brownout took a mother-daughter bonding moment away. 😦

My weekly iPod playlist update. I have this habit of listing down random titles of songs that I like and downloading them at once. Last Wednesday was their scheduled download, but power supply failed me. I just played them in my mind until today that I got to have them on my playlist.

You see, I cannot do these things without Agent P and Mr. I (“I” stands for Internet. What did I say again on giving names?) They go hand in hand, and when they are disabled, I might as well be. Going on four days without a computer (or probably more, I’ve lost track already) made me realize how dependent my world is on the Internet. I literally cannot do anything. It was like my body was on a break but my whole system is itching to do something. Yes, that’s how crazy I got when my PC and the Internet got dysfunctional for a while.

I did my assignments the hard(er) way. I went to UP Diliman to search for Critical Theory books. I got a hard copy instead of a PDF file. Mom called me on the telephone. I had to ask for a leave on my job through the phone as well. And I had to use the radio if I wanted to listen to the songs that I liked.

It is undeniable that the Internet is a combination of all things we know and all things we dream about. However, when the inevitable happens, we still use the “old” or traditional things. I do not say that we use those things just because we have no choice, but I am so grateful that they are still there.

The power failure made me realize that there are things that the internet could fail too. And when that happens, we can still thank God for those other things that He provided before that we sometimes take for granted.

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5 Comments Add yours

  1. kimgiel says:

    KC, I know the excitement you feel whenever you get to go home. I’m also living in a dorm, and this week, I didn’t stay there.Haha. I did my daily travel from Las Pinas to school and from UPM to Las Pinas for five days. I miss traveling and passing by coastal road, I guess. No, I miss home and the freedom and the feeling of really being in my own place.
    Yes, technology can fail us that’s why we must not forget how to do things without it. Sometimes, it also helps if we get to practice doing things manually, without technology’s help.
    BTW, we had a power failure yesterday during our report in 152. Haha.

  2. KC says:

    Yo, Kim! 🙂 Surely, there’d be no place that would ever beat home. That was the reason I was able to travel 45 kilometers (x2) everyday for the past three years. If my crutches thingy didn’t happen, I’m still probably going home everyday. 🙂

    Yes, we would always have an advantage if we always have a back-up plan (reminds me of OC107, wherein we have to use manila papers if the LCD projector is acting up). So when the time comes that something as unexpected as this happens, you’ll still be able to go on. 🙂

  3. Marj Casal says:

    KC! I am going to blog about the same thing! (Not really, just the same basyang topic.) Hehe. And you’ll see, too how dependent I am to new social media and how I can be a caveman without it. (Is this statement even correct?) Haha.

    “So, when I got the chance to be in our home in Bulacan, the word “excited” is an understatement. I will get to see my family, the television, a refrigerator, and Agent P—the computer (“P” stands for “personal”, as in personal computer. Yes, I am a loser in giving names). Just when I was about to sit and look around on Facebook, something unexpected happened. So unexpected, it made me invent words to scream.

    A brownout.”

    I remembered our 7AM class with Sir Paras upon reading this. Isn’t like the same kind of disappointment you feel everytime you rush to get to school, torture your heart by running up the stairs only to find us coming out of the classroom and we’ll tell you, with our hearts broken: “KC! WALANG CLASS!” 😛 He could have just told us beforehand through SMS right? Hahahaha.

  4. KC says:

    Yo, Marj! Haha! The typhoon Basyang experience (and all the things it brought) really gave us experiences worth blogging. I can imagine that you, too, and other batchmates felt almost paralyzed. 😛

    Oh, I really won’t forget those 7AM Comm 2 class experiences. Good thing you guys haven’t thought of taking a snapshot of my face everytime you tell me the three magic words (KC, WALANG CLASS!) haha. Yes, if he managed to tell us beforehand via SMS, it wouldn’t have been a heartbreaking experience.

    Which makes me thank God for Facebook (above other Social Networking Sites), that is used by most of our professors in telling us about cancellation of classes and other emergencies. 🙂

  5. niccy says:

    The internet makes life convenient for us, that’s fact!

    Though laziness could be an implication of it, I would have to say that the perks of a click this, click that world is convenience and efficiency! Online libraries are a heck of help when you’re constrained with time (and transportation money for that matter).

    I would consider myself lucky to have all-day access to the Web here at home cause it makes my life more controllable. If I’m hungry, I can just go to the kitchen and grab something to eat whereas if I would be in an internet shop, I would have to spend to eat something.

    What I miss though sometimes is the ‘feel’ of a real book or a reading material per se. The Web doesn’t give me that experience but it sure does give me an alternative one!

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